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Author Topic: H beam vs I beam  (Read 3277 times)

352Ford

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H beam vs I beam
« on: January 04, 2006, 09:24:10 PM »

I have never really heard an intellegent conversation debating the two, so other than just switching the direction they are stiff in, what do we have?
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cometgt1974

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H beam vs I beam
« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2006, 05:32:58 PM »

On Olivers website, they say there I-beam design is stronger than any H-beam design.
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352Ford

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H beam vs I beam
« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2006, 10:12:49 AM »

Yeah, there are a few companys that are claiming that.  I thought the main advantage of the H-beam (other than roating the direction it is stiff in 90 deg) is you can fit more crossectional area into the rod, and therefore make it stronger (but heavier)

there may be a point if you get your geomtry/materail properties right on the I beam that the lightness (less inertia) effectively adds enough strength to overcome the H-beam at high revs.
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underdog

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H beam vs I beam
« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2006, 12:20:03 PM »

For years the battle has raged on as to which is better, an I-beam or an H-beam. In pure tension and compression, they are both equally capable, assuming equal cross-sectional area. But when you add the fact that some components of the combustion event attempt to screw the piston down the cylinder, the greater distance from the centerline of the pin to the edge of the beam gives the H-beam an advantage in resisting such twisting forces. I?ve seen both designs used successfully in a wide variety of extreme applications, so the jury is still out. Perhaps the biggest advantage of the H-beam design is that it gives the manufacturer more flexibility when sculpting the rod into the most effective form from a strength-to-mass standpoint. I personally have the Oliver's.
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Dogg
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mopar dave

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Re: H beam vs I beam
« Reply #4 on: October 28, 2006, 06:34:05 AM »

 352ford, i built and currently run eagle I beams in a 408 stroker sb mopar with no issues as of yet.  11.1 comp with a 450g piston, shift at 6500 and i have ran it to 7200 without issue.   i'v talked to eagle's tech several times and depending on who you talk to they'll handle 550 flywheel hp at 7000rpm.  i had one tech there tell me there I beam would handle 600hp@7200rpm with a light piston, they have to advertise these at 500hp max because that is with a heavy piston, they dont want the liability's.  if your using nitrous i'd use the H beam just for piece of mind, just my 2 cents.
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Fat Tony

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Re: H beam vs I beam
« Reply #5 on: December 20, 2006, 08:43:13 PM »

I have run both, but it seems that regardless of manufacturer, that the top of the line rods are I beams(carrilo, howards, oliver, etc.). when we were doing tensile pulls in college the strength of the pull was more influenced by material type not shape on properly prepped samples. the biggest cause of early failures were from stress risers where someone had nicked or scratched the surface during installation. Bottom line is pick a rod that is suitable for your combination. piston weight & rpm, compression ratio, nitrous or forced induction, are all factors to consider.
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